Authors

  • Abby Sunderland

    Abigail Jillian "Abby" Sunderland (born October 19, 1993) is an American former sailor who, in 2010, unsuccessfully attempted to become the youngest person to sail solo around the world. ...
    [ more info ][ books ]

  • Abby Wambach

    Mary Abigail Wambach (born June 2, 1980) is an American retired soccer player, coach, two-time Olympic gold medalist and FIFA Women's World Cup champion. A six-time winner of the U.S. Soccer Athlete of the Year award, Wambach was a regular on the U.S. women's national soccer team from 2003 to 2015, earning her first cap in 2001. As a forward, she currently stands as the highest all-time goal scorer for the national team and holds the world record for international goals for both female and male soccer players with 184 goals. Wambach was awarded the 2012 FIFA World Player of the Year, becoming the first American woman to win the award in ten years. She was included on the 2015 Time 100 list as one of the most influential people in the world. Wambach competed in four FIFA Women's World Cup tournaments: 2003 in the United States, 2007 in China, ...
    [ more info ][ books ]

  • Abdullah Yusuf Ali

    Abdullah Yusuf Ali, CBE, MA, LL.M, FRSA, FRSL (; Urdu: عبداللہ یوسف علی‎‎; 14 April 1872 – 10 December 1953) was a British-Indian barrister and scholar who wrote a number of books about Islam and whose translation of the Qur'an into English is one of the most widely known and used in the English-speaking world. A supporter of the British war effort during World War I, Ali received the CBE in 1917 for his services to that cause. Following two unhappy marriages his children turned against him and he died destitute and alone in London in 1953. ...
    [ more info ][ books ]

  • Abigail Johnson

    Abigail Pierrepont "Abby" Johnson (born December 19, 1961) is an American businesswoman. Since 2014, Johnson is president and chief executive officer of US investment firm Fidelity Investments (FMR), and chairwoman of its international sister company Fidelity International (FIL). Fidelity was founded by her grandfather Edward C. Johnson II. Her father Edward C. "Ned" Johnson III remains chairman emeritus of FMR. As of March 2013, the Johnson family owned a 49% stake in the company. In November 2016, Johnson was named chairman and will remain CEO and president, giving her full control of Fidelity with 45,000 employees worldwide. Johnson's wealth is approximately $16.5 billion, making her one of the world's wealthiest women. ...
    [ more info ][ books ]

  • Abigail Pogrebin

    Abigail Pogrebin (born May 17, 1965) is an American writer. She is the author of My Jewish Year: 18 Holidays, One Wondering Jew, published in 2017, and the 2005 book Stars of David: Prominent Jews Talk About Being Jewish. Her second book, One and the Same: My Life As an Identical Twin and What I’ve Learned About Everyone’s Struggle to Be Singular, was published in October 2009. Her bestselling Amazon Kindle Single, Showstopper, recounts her teenage adventure in the original Broadway cast of Stephen Sondheim’s flop, Merrily We Roll Along. Formerly a producer for Charlie Rose at PBS and Mike Wallace at 60 Minutes, she moderates her own interview series at the JCC in Manhattan and has been President of Central Synagogue from 2015 to present (her tenure ends in 2018). She is a daughter of Letty Cottin Pogrebin, the co-founder of Ms. Magazine, and Bert Pogrebin, a management-side labor ...
    [ more info ][ books ]

  • Abner Doubleday

    Abner Doubleday (June 26, 1819 – January 26, 1893) was a career United States Army officer and Union general in the American Civil War. He fired the first shot in defense of Fort Sumter, the opening battle of the war, and had a pivotal role in the early fighting at the Battle of Gettysburg. Gettysburg was his finest hour, but his relief by Maj. Gen. George G. Meade caused lasting enmity between the two men. In San Francisco, after the war, he obtained a patent on the cable car railway that still runs there. In his final years in New Jersey, he was a prominent member and later president of the Theosophical Society. In 1908, fifteen years after his death, Doubleday was declared by the Mills Commission to have invented the game of baseball (a claim never made by Doubleday during his lifetime). This claim has been thoroughly debunked by ...
    [ more info ][ books ]

  • Abraham Lincoln

    Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865) was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through its Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, paved the way for the abolition of slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy. Born in Hodgenville, Kentucky, Lincoln grew up on the western frontier in Kentucky and Indiana. Largely self-educated, he became a lawyer in Illinois, a Whig Party leader, and was elected to the Illinois House of Representatives, in which he served for eight years. Elected to the United States House of Representatives in 1846, Lincoln promoted rapid modernization of the economy and opposed the Mexican–American War. After a single term, he returned to Illinois ...
    [ more info ][ books ]

  • Abraham Verghese

    Abraham Verghese (born 1955) is an Indian American physician-author, Professor for the Theory and Practice of Medicine at Stanford University Medical School and Senior Associate Chair of the Department of Internal Medicine. He is also the author of three best-selling books, two memoirs and a novel. In 2011, he was elected to be a member of the Institute of Medicine. He received the National Humanities Medal from President Barack Obama in 2015. He was born in Ethiopia to parents from Kerala, India, who worked as teachers. In 2009, Knopf published his new book and first novel, Cutting for Stone. in 2010, Random House published the paperback version of the book and since that time, it has risen steadily up the bestseller charts, ranking #2 on the New York Times trade paperback fiction list on March 13, 2011. It has been on the New York Times list for well over two ...
    [ more info ][ books ]

  • Abu Sayyaf

    ‹See Tfd› Abu Sayyaf ( ( listen) ; Arabic: جماعة أبو سياف‎; Jamāʿat Abū Sayyāf, ASG; Filipino: Grupong Abu Sayyaf), unofficially known as the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant – Philippines Province, is a Jihadist militant group that follows the Wahhabi doctrine of Sunni Islam based in and around Jolo and Basilan islands in the southwestern part of the Philippines, where for more than four decades, Moro groups have been engaged in an insurgency for an independent province in the country. The group is considered violent, and was responsible for the Philippines' worst terrorist attack, the bombing of Superferry 14 in 2004, which killed 116 people. The name of the group is derived from the Arabic abu (Arabic: أبو‎) ("father of"), and sayyaf (Arabic: سيّاف‎) ("swordsmith"). As of 2012, the group was estimated to have between 200 and 400 members, down from 1,250 in 2000. They use mostly ...
    [ more info ][ books ]

  • Ace Atkins

    Ace Atkins (born June 28, 1970) is an American journalist and author. Atkins worked as a crime reporter in the newsroom of The Tampa Tribune before he published his first novel, Crossroad Blues, in 1998. He became a full-time novelist at the age of 30. ...
    [ more info ][ books ]